Category Archives: Innovation and Technology

How New Technologies Could Transform Africa’s Health Care System

aug18-06-685027761-KATERYNA-KONSCIENCE-PHOTO-LIBRARYIn early June, at the invitation of the European Commission to Brussels (Belgium), I toured some fascinating AI and blockchain-based projects. Across industrial sectors, engineers are creating new technologies with potentially disruptive implications for the current architectural order of the global economy. One of the technologies, an “AI doctor”, shows great promise for the future of healthcare in Africa. Read more>>

From robot insects to human-sniffing sensors, this rescue tech could save lives

The Smart Road Tech That’s Making Driving Faster, Safer, And Just Better

In 2014, the country spent $165 billion on highway construction, operation, and maintenance, according to the Congressional Budget Office. There are signs that some of that money is being invested in smart road technology, alternative energy infrastructure, and traffic management powered by artificial intelligence. The Fourth Industrial Revolution is finally hitting the road. Read more>>

Implantable 3D-printed organs could be coming sooner than you think

bioprinterAt MBC Biolabs, an incubator for biotech startups in San Francisco’s Dogpatch neighborhood, a team of scientists and interns working for the small startup Prellis Biologics have just taken a big step on the path toward developing viable 3D-printed organs for humans. It can manufacture capillaries at a size and speed that would deliver 3D-printed organs to the market within the next five years. Read more>>

Pulling Water, Fuel, and Power From Thin Air Is Getting Practical

fuel-water-power-from-thin-air-co2-carbon-engineeringPulling things from thin air is generally considered a magic trick. But several recent research papers suggest we could soon be extracting valuable resources like water, fuel, and power from the atmosphere. Startup Carbon Engineering published a new technique for turning atmospheric CO2 into fuel last week that is starting to make the approach seem economically viable. Read more>>