Like It Or Not, Personal Health Technology Is Getting Smarter

With sensors that can collect data on body movements, heart rate, blood pressure and other metrics, the list of health trackers that go beyond activity trackers like Fitbits gets longer each year. “There’s definitely an explosion of these things,” says Dr. Joseph Kvedar, the vice president for connected health at Partners HealthCare in Boston, and an associate professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School. Read more>>

The Three Mindset Habits That Helped This Scientist Launch A Startup

It was December 2010 and Frida Polli’s life was unfolding even better than she planned. After graduating from Dartmouth, she earned her PhD in Neuropsychology and was completing her postdoctoral fellowship. She found herself yearning for a different career. Polli decided to make a radical life shift by applying to Harvard Business School, where an opportunity to launch a startup, the embodiment of her quest, quickly presented itself. Read more>>

Udacity, with eye to eventual IPO, says revenue more than doubled in 2017

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Online education company Udacity, which offers courses in high-tech subjects such as machine learning, said on Tuesday it more than doubled its annual revenue last year and added about 34,000 new students to its online degree programs. The company, founded by Sebastian Thrun, one of Silicon Valley’s pioneers in self-driving cars, said it increased revenue to $70 million in 2017 from $29 million the prior year. Read more>>

J.R.R. Tolkien’s Writing Process On Creating Good Work

One dreary day, a professor was sitting at his desk. He jotted down a sentence on a blank paper: “In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” This line sparked J.R.R. Tolkien’s idea of The Hobbit. Later, Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings and it was turned into one of the highest-grossing and critically acclaimed film series of all time. It took J.R.R. Tolkien over a dozen years to plan and write The Lord of the Rings. So how exactly did he manage to complete such a gargantuan task — and write weaving storylines on top of it all? Read more>>



Want to Run a Successful Business? Hire More Women

Silicon Valley has long celebrated failure, encouraging founders to aim big and fail fast, pick themselves up, and try again. In that spirit, there’s one big failure to add to the list: Silicon Valley has failed women, period, and it’s time for the industry to own it. Women not only represent half the population but drive 70 to 80 percent of consumer purchases. If only for the sake of profits, women should not be excluded from the process of imagining and creating new products. Read more>>

Waverly Labs offers real-time translation with its Pilot earbuds

Sometimes you travel all the way to Barcelona, only to meet up with a startup that’s been operating right around the block. Waverly Labs is a 20 person Brooklyn-based company that specializes in real-time translation through a pair of Bluetooth earbuds. The product is the culmination of four years of research on both the hardware and software side of the equation, funded by a wildly success Indiegogo campaign that netted the company $4.4 million (around 3,000-percent of its initial goal). Read more>>

Brands and blockchain: How Walmart, Burger King and De Beers are snuggling up to decentralization

Is Bitcoin the future of money? Has the cryptocurrency bubble already popped? It depends who you ask. The topic of Bitcoin is just as polarizing as it is hot. But no matter how volatile Bitcoin stocks may be, its underlying technology, blockchain, has huge potential to transform our industry. Blockchain can clean up the rampant ad fraud and rebuild trust, and more and more companies are popping up to help guide that along. However, it’s not just technology companies that are embracing blockchain in its early stages. Read more>>

Master the Art of Influence — Persuasion as a Skill and Habit

Tyler Odean kicked off our meeting with a contentious statement: “For startups and founders, being persuasive is way more important than having vision.” Given how many thousands of articles have been written about finding and nailing down mission and vision statements, this is jarring to hear. But when he explains, it makes sense. To succeed, startup founders need to cultivate persuasion as a skill and habit he says. “That’s how they’re going to get the funding, the talent, the momentum to make their vision work.” Read more>>

With $250 million, Peter Diamandis’ new startup is all about taking stem cells from placentas

Stem cells derived from a human placenta hold the key to unlocking a myriad of potentials in regenerative medicine and are the focus of X-Prize and Singularity University founder Peter Diamandis’ new endeavor. Called Celularity, the startup is a spinout from Celgene, a global biopharmaceutical company creating gene therapies. Celularity in the hopes of using stem cells found in the human placenta to quickly regenerate tissue and organs needed to treat cancer and other diseases. Read more>>

Attention, Founders: That ICO Is About To Dilute You, Too

ICOs are nothing less than a tectonic shift in the startup-funding environment. Alas, one of the most common misconceptions about ICOs is that they allow “non-dilutive financing.” You aren’t selling any shares, so there isn’t any dilution, right? Wrong. Clearly, when selling shares or tokens to investors, the investors expect those to appreciate and increase in value. If that’s the case, they will be sharing some of the future value of your venture, so there must be some dilution hidden here.  Read more>>

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