Wayfair and HubSpot IPOs Could Be Just The Beginning For Boston Startup Scened

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Boston-based startups have had a successful IPOs in the past two weeks. As furniture shopping service Wayfair went public and raised $300 million in its IPO, while HubSpot also had successful IPO. These success may spur the startup scene in Boston.

Although these new IPO’s have the spotlight, Boston has been quite active with startup companies. It is safe to say that most of the credit goes to MIT and Harvard, who produce the talent each year. From Bill Gates to Mark Zuckerberg, all started their journey from the city of Boston. Thus a lot of young smart people with great ideas thrive in this region indicating that these two IPO’s will only boost more entrepreneurs to push harder for their ideas. As more money and talent flow in, Boston could be an alternative for Silicon Valley in the Future. Read More>>

E-Learning Startup Udacity Raises $35M to Launch ‘Nanodegrees’

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The latest e-learning startup called Udacity Inc. has raised 35 million to redefine the way people learn.Unlike traditional companies in the marketplace, Udacity targets college grads and is built with the help of industry partners seeking skilled employees. Various Corporations provide the content and pay Udacity to develop online classes. Roughly three million users have signed up for the free Udacity courses. Read More>>

 

 

The Defense Industry Is Expanding the Use of 3D Printing

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3D printers have now made its way into the Defense Industry. The DOD is using 3D printers across various military services. Lockheed Martin is also is using high-tech 3D printers to manufacturer tools used to build the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, a next-generation fighter jet that will be flown by the U.S. military and allies. The Obama administration has been interested in expanding the use of 3D printing in America for a number of years and now we see the use being expanded into various fields in the Defense Industry. Read More>>

Crumpled graphene could provide an unconventional energy storage

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Graphene paper, which is a material formed by bonding together layers of the two-dimensional form of carbon, has been found to yield new properties that could be useful for creating stretchable supercapacitors to store energy for flexible electronic devices, due to its large surface area per mass.

The finding is reported in the journal Scientific Reports by MIT’s Xuanhe Zhao, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and civil and environmental engineering. It has robust properties, which is one of the strongest materials and by crumpling a sheet of grapheme paper into a chaotic mass of folds, they can make a super capacitor that can easily be bent, folded, or stretched to as much as 800 percent of its original size. Read More>>

Passwords could be replaced with ‘heartbeat’ authentication

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Bionym, a Canadian company has created a wearable device that allows people to use their heartbeats to unlock passwords on their devices. The wearable called Nymi, uses heart rhythm as a sensor to unlock devices as heart beats are as unique as fingerprints. As hacking and data breach has become a major issue, Karl Martin, CEO and founder of the company has high hopes for the device. Read More>>

You Call This Thai Food? The Robotic Taster Will Be the Judge

Thailand’s prime minister, Yingluck Shinawatra realized in one of her global expeditions that the Thai cuisine available abroad were unworthy of the name. The issue was distressing enough to be raised at a cabinet meeting and the government has decided to unveil a robot to standardize the art of Thai food.

This state of the art robot consists of a boxy contraption filled with sensors and microchips which was developed over a budget of 30 million baht, around $1 million.  It produces a chemical signature, which it measures against a standard deemed to be the authentic version.

Pioneers in nanotechnology wanted the cheapest and easiest


approach to measure food which results in a direct rating of the same. Because even computers cannot judge taste, the food is compared with a standard derived from a database of popular preferences for each dish with 80 being the standardized rating. Read More>>

Chief analytics officer: The ultimate big data job?

The need of the hour demands to know if the Chief Analytics Officer is the next ultimate big data job. The answer lies within as someone needs to be accountable for strategic decisions around data. Senior directors believe that the pioneers see the power in data and the power in harnessing that data for competitive advantage.

The core intention is to use these analytics to drive revenue. Many organizations are investing in big data projects to justify the creation of a CAO role. IDC predicts that the market for this technology and services will grow at a 27% clip annually through 2017.

CAOs must have the ability to act as a conduit to bridge the gap between the technology teams and the business teams. Their roles comprise of improving operations and identifying future growth opportunities. Recent study shows that 69% of companies said customer experience was vital for their growth strategies while 12% believe that they take full advantage of analytics to extract customer insights and deliver better service. Read More>>

Pavlok’s Wristband That Electroshocks You For Facebooking Or Skipping Workouts Now On Indiegogo

 

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A startup called Pavlok hopes to raise funds for its new electric shock wrist band by going public on indiegogo. Pavlok intends that its electric shock wristband will make us excersie, wake up on time, and stop procrastinating. The company is looking to raise $50,000 for production and manufacturing of the wristband, which it plans to ship in March 2015. Read More>>

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